U.S. will work with Israel to build on regional normalization agreements: Biden national security adviser

<p>”When @ShippersUnbound [Tim Shipman] and I interviewed Donald Trump in 2019, we became fascinated by what the little red button did,” <a href=”https://twitter.com/tnewtondunn/status/1352284365854806017?s=20″ rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>Dunn tweeted</a>. “Eventually Trump pressed it, and a butler swiftly brought in a Diet Coke on a silver platter. It’s gone now.” </p><p>Throughout Trump’s presidency, his obsessive love of the beverage was well-documented. In 2017, the <a href=”https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/to-your-health/wp/2017/12/12/trump-reportedly-drinks-12-cans-of-diet-coke-each-day-is-that-healthy/” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>Washington Post published</a> that he reportedly drank a dozen cans of Diet Coke per day and, while the majority of Americans are just finding out about the Diet Coke button, that same year, <a href=”https://time.com/4758059/donald-trump-coke-nuclear-button/” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>Demetri Sevastopulo wrote for The Financial Times</a> about how he noticed the red button on Trump’s desk. He jokingly asked if it was the nuclear button, to which Trump replied, “No, no, everyone thinks it is. Everyone does get a little nervous when I press that button.” </p><p>According to the <a href=”https://apnews.com/article/205ad54dc72e4ab69b3a214c96eeb9ce” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>Associated Press</a>, the button has been a fixture “on the Resolute Desk that presidents have used for decades,” though not for summoning diet soda. The fact that Trump appropriated for it for such use is, frankly, unsurprising. Its existence is a reminder for some of the most laughable parts of Trump’s personality (and its removal seems to have been an almost a necessary exorcism). </p><p>While assigning goodness or inherent value to a food item can turn into an uncomfortable pseudo-classist exercise (like when the New York Times hosted a quiz where readers could guess whether <a href=”https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/10/27/upshot/biden-trump-poll-quiz.html” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>refrigerators belonged to Biden voters or Trump voters</a> based on their contents), there’s a certain “Home Alone 2: Escape to New York” childishness inherent to slapping a button 12 times a day as a way to demand a Diet Coke on a silver platter. </p><p>It’s a warped idea of what fanciness or indulgence denotes, which is both a perfect encapsulation of Trump’s public persona and, in part, what led to Diet Coke’s heyday in the ’90s. </p><p>Consider the <a href=”https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3303819/Inside-Donald-Trump-s-100m-penthouse-lots-marble-gold-rimmed-cups-son-s-toy-personalized-Mercedes-15-000-book-risqu-statues.html” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>often-memed image of Trump and Melania standing, wax figure-like, in their $100 million New York penthouse</a>. It’s gaudy and gold-covered with columns, chandeliers and frescos reminiscent of a Cheesecake Factory dining room. That photograph is the visual definition of the adage, “You can’t buy taste.”</p><p>Trump’s tastelessness was a glaring, omnipresent facet of his presidency. A photograph that feels strikingly similar was taken in 2019, when Trump invited the Clemson Tigers, that year’s national college football champions, for a White House dinner, only to serve them<a href=”https://www.salon.com/2019/01/29/a-majority-of-clemsons-black-football-players-opted-out-of-donald-trumps-fast-food-feast-report_partner/” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”> a buffet of Filet-O-Fish sandwiches and slices of Domino’s pizza</a>, a choice that many criticized as<a href=”https://www.vox.com/the-goods/2019/1/15/18183617/trump-clemson-mcdonalds-burger-king-wendys-dominos” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”> racist and classist. </a>He stands beneath a portrait of Abraham Lincoln with his arms outstretched over a mahogany table, stacked high with cardboard burger boxes and flimsy plastic packets of fast food sauces that were balanced inside pewter gravy boats. </p><p>”We went out and we ordered American fast food, paid for by me,” he told reporters that night. “Lots of hamburgers, lots of pizza. Three hundred hamburgers. Many, many French fries.”</p><p>It may seem odd that a well-documented fast food devotee (and former McDonald’s and Pizza Hut spokesperson) like Trump would opt for Diet Coke instead of the real thing, but it’s important to consider what the beverage likely meant to him. </p><p>In his essay <a href=”https://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/the-decline-and-fall-of-diet-coke-and-the-power-generation-that-loved-it” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>”The Decline and Fall of Diet Coke and the Power Generation That Loved It,”</a> Nathan Heller asserts that while the Coca-Cola company tried to endear the beverage to “hip, scrappy youths, it became, enduringly, the beverage of the power generation that emerged across the Clinton years and cheered tie-less, outside-the-box, rule-bending thought in business and in life.” </p><p>”During the late eighties and nineties, Diet Coke seemed less fussy, less patrician, less ‘Frasier’ than second-wave coffee,” Heller wrote.”It helped define a novel archetype of masculinity — the bootstraps kid who’d made it big, who was cool and modern, in a suit.” </p><p>This is, despite the fact, that diet soda was traditionally marketed to women as a way to control weight. Emily Contois, the author of <a href=”https://www.salon.com/2020/11/16/diners-dudes-and-diets-emily-contois/” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>”Diners, Dudes and Diets: How Gender and Power Collide in Food Media and Culture,”</a> wrote that while Coca-Cola went after male and female customers with Diet Coke, unlike their previous diet product Tab, <a href=”https://theattic.jezebel.com/that-shape-he-cant-forget-the-bittersweet-history-of-d-1845618613″ rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>they were largely unsuccessful. </a></p><p>”Men (and broader culture) seemed to deem the beverage derisively feminine in later decades,” Contois wrote. “For example, in the Atlanta Journal-Constitution an unidentified Coca-Cola executive declared that diet is a ‘four-letter word’ for men, or at least those aged 16–24.” </p><p>When I emailed Contois to inquire as to why she thought President Trump, a leader who was deeply preoccupied with a limited and pugilistic view of masculinity, would drink Diet Coke, her answer was succinct.</p><p>”Trump seemed to believe that rules, of any sort, don’t apply to him,” she wrote via email. “That guided his food and beverage choices — from a dozen Diet Cokes a day to well-done steak with ketchup to copious fast food — and much of his presidency.” </p><p>While it’s impossible to know what exactly Diet Coke <em>meant </em>to Trump (though we know it was something he would request during tense conversations, like when he cried out for one while discussing purchasing the rights to a story about an <a href=”http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/the-decline-and-fall-of-diet-coke-and-the-power-generation-that-loved-it” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>alleged affair he had with ex-Playboy model Karen Mcdougall</a>), the bizarre optics surrounding the revelation of the Diet Coke button is a fitting epilogue to his presidency. It’s a reminder of a man who could have just used an office mini-fridge to satiate his cravings, but obviously liked the feeling of being able to summon a servant with a cold drink at the push of a button. While so many of his stump speeches were bolstered by ramblings about being a man of the people, his actions consistently contradicted that — even down to how he took his dozen daily sodas. </p><p>But the Trump era has concluded, and <a href=”https://www.forbes.com/sites/nicholasreimann/2021/01/21/moon-rock-in-diet-coke-button-out-here-are-the-changes-joe-biden-has-made-to-oval-office-decor/?sh=2d81c3306a2f” rel=”noopener noreferrer” target=”_blank”>the Oval Office already looks different</a>. Where a bust of Fred Trump used to preside over the office, there is now a statue of labor organizer Cesar Chavez; Trump’s beige rug has been swapped out for a royal blue replacement, and a portrait of Andrew Jackson was taken down in favor of a painting of Benjamin Franklin. No word yet on whether the Resolute Desk button will be replaced — and if so, what pushing it will summon. </p>

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